Researcher Profiles

Posted by admin on September 13th, 2012 — Posted in

Jessica Achberger

Jessica Achberger received her PhD in History from the University of Texas at Austin. Her dissertation focused on the foreign policy and economic development of Zambia, particularly in terms of its relationship with China. An historian of both Africa and Asia, she is interested particularly in linkages between the two continents. She is currently a Research Fellow at the Southern African Institute of Policy and Research in Lusaka, Zambia, and publishes regularly for both academic and non-academic publications on Africa, China, history, and economic development.

Email: jessica.achberger@gmail.com, admin@network4zambia.com

 

Pelle Ambersntsson

Pelle Ambersntsson is a PhD candidate in the Department of Human and Economic Geography, Goteborg University, Sweden. Ambersntsson’s doctoral thesis deals with the present livelihood situation among smallholders in Chipata district from a historical perspective. Of specific interest is the different governments’ policies towards smallholders from the colonial era up to present time and how these policies arrived at the local level. Apart from using archival research, Ambersntsson has also conducted extensive fieldwork through interviewing smallholders, the elderly, and active and retired extension staff.

E-mail: pelle.amberntsson@geography.gu.se, pelle.amberntsson@handels.gu.se

 

Christopher Annear

Christopher Annear is a PhD candidate in Sociocultural Anthropology at Boston University. Annear’s research interests include sociocultural and sociobiological aspects of inland fisheries and aquaculture, primarily in Luapula Province. He is soon to resume field research on the Upper Luapula River in and around Mwansabombwe, working with fishers in fishing camps, Lunda authorities on the mainland, and Department of Fisheries personnel in Nchelenge and Mansa. Additional research will be undertaken among fish farmers primarily on the Luapula plateau.

E-mail: cannear@bu.edu, pompwe@yahoo.com

 

Oliver Bakewell

Oliver Bakewell is Senior Research Officer at the International Migration Institute at the University of Oxford. Bakewell has conducted research into cross-border movements between Angola and western Zambia and the self-settlement and integration of Angolan refugees in Mwinilunga District. He is planning a follow-up study to look at the changing relationship of people in NW Province and the border, since the end of the Angolan conflict in 2002. His other research interests include the changing patterns of migration within Africa; the relationship between migration and development; and the interface between migration policy and migrants’ behaviour.

E-mail: oliver.bakewell@qeh.ox.ac.uk

 

Michael Barrett

Micheal Barrett is the Curator of African Ethnography, Museum of Ethnography, Stockholm. Barrett conducted research in Zambia in 2009 on Mobility in the Margins: Migration, Subjectivity and Governmentality in Rural Central Africa. He described the field as follows: ‘Ethnographic fieldwork will be carried out among young migrants in Zambia’s Western Province, a province that in view of its high poverty rates, low economic productivity, high net out-migration of young people, poor infrastructure and service access is the epitome of a rural backwater seemingly unaffected by the global exchange of people and resources. Yet a range of indicators shows that the province is part of socio-economic and political tendencies of continental and even global scale. These include increasing calls for regional integration and increased cross-border mobility, decentralization and economic liberalization, changing migration regimes and rural income diversification, and new forms of mineral extraction.’

E-mail: michael.barrett@etnografiska.se

 

Stuart Barton

Stuart is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of History at the University of Cambridge writing on the GRZ’s relationship with foreign financial capital after independence in 1964. His research investigates the responses by foreign direct investors to institutional change brought about by abrupt shifts in Zambian government policy, and the economic constraints these responses have had on the economy. The work hopes to expand on more politically focused accounts of post-independence Zambian policy-making and present some historical context through which to better understand the eventual re-emergence of FDI in Zambia after 2000.

Email: sjb279@cam.ac.uk

 

Koen Bostoen

Koen Bostoen works for the Africa Museum in Ter Vuren, Belgium in the Department of Cultural Anthropology / Linguistics. Bostoen’s research topic is: Languages, Genes and The Bantu Problem: Western Zambia as a Case Study for an Interdisciplinary Approach to the Population History of Southern Central Africa. In collaboration with the Junior Scientists Group on Comparative Population Linguistics from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, Bostoen is planning to elucidate the linguistic and genetic effects of three different (pre)historic waves of migration in an especially understudied part of Africa, namely the Western Province of Zambia.

E-mail: koen.bostoen@africamuseum.be

 

Andrew Bowman

Andrew Bowman is a PhD candidate at the University of Manchester. Bowman’s thesis attempts to explain the changing roles given to and forms taken by science, technology and expertise in Zambia’s agricultural development over the past half century. It focuses upon four distinct episodes thereof: firstly, agricultural improvement schemes in the late colonial era (particularly the African Farmers Improvement Scheme); secondly, mechanization, rural cooperatives and state planning in the First Republic; thirdly, the change to a neoliberal agricultural development model; and lastly the controversy surrounding GM crops in the early 21st century. The study will also explore differing interpretations of Zambia’s agricultural development history amongst communities of experts, in order to understand how historical representation influences the creation of development knowledge.

E-mail: Andrew.Bowman@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk

 

Chewe Chabatama

Dr. Chewe M. Chabatama is Lecturer in History at the University of Zambia. Since completing his PhD thesis – ‘Peasant Farming, the State and Food Security in the North-Western Province of Zambia, 1902-1964’, University of Toronto, 1999 – he has been working on a number of papers, including: ‘Household and Food Security among Pre-Colonial Societies of North Western Zambia’; ‘Coping with Ecological Adversity: Food Supply and the Locust Plague in North Western Zambia, 1929-1939. He is working on a CODESRIA-funded book entitled What Went Wrong? Agricultural Liberalisation and Food Supply in Zambia, 1992-2002.

E-mail: cchabatama@hss.unza.zm

 

Solange Guo Chatelard

Solange Guo Chatelard is a PhD candidate at Science Po, Paris and a Research Associate at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Germany. She has carried out extensive fieldwork in Zambia and China. Her thesis is an ethnography of the everyday lives of Chinese migrants in Zambia from the 1990s until today. She has produced two film documentaries about China’s relations with Zambia: “When China Met Africa” (BBC, ARTE), “King Cobra and the Dragon” (Al Jazeera).

Email: solange.chatelard@gmail.com

 

Nic Cheeseman

Nic Cheeseman is a University Lecturer in African Politics at Oxford Universityand Hugh Price Fellow, Jesus College. His research interests include political parties (looking at Kenya and Zambia); ethnicity and ethnic mobilization in multi-party Africa; and the life-cycle of the one-party state. His PhD thesis, submitted in 2006, was entitled, ‘The Rise and Fall of Civil-Authoritarianism in Africa: Patronage, Participation and Political Parties in Kenya and Zambia.’

E-mail: niccheeseman@gmail.com

 

Austin Cheyeka

Austin Cheyeka is in the Religious Studies Department at the University of Zambia. He is currently working on a biography of Rev. Nevers Mumba.

E-mail:

 

Hikabwa Chipande

Hikabwa Chipande is a PhD Candidate in the Department of History at Michigan State University. Hikabwa’s doctoral thesis is on the twentieth century political and social history of football (soccer) in Zambia. It focuses on national identity (less on government and political leaders), and the agency of local people in constructing a national community and a common culture among the 73 language groups in Zambia. It also looks at how these people appropriated football and developed it to become the most popular sport in the country.

Email: chipande@msu.edu

 

Yizenge A. Chondoka

Dr. Yizenge A. Chondoka, a Senior Lecturer in History at UNZA, has recently completed a manuscript entitled, History of the Tumbuka to 1900. The Tumbuka under the M’nyanjagha, Chewa, Balowoka, Senga and Ngoni Chiefs. He is also preparing two other books: The Legendary Zambian University Graduates Before Independence Day, 24th October 1964 and The Relationship between Cultural Practices and the Spread of Hiv-Aids: The Case of Sexual Cleansing and Polygamous Marriages in Zambian Society.

E-mail: yizengechondoka@yahoo.com

 

Lisa Cliggett

Lisa Cliggett (PhD, Indiana University) is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Kentucky.  She has carried out ethnographic fieldwork in Zambia since 1992, focusing on issues of household economy, intergenerational relations, and most recently migration and environmental change in a GMA bordering Kafue National Park.  She has published a number of articles in various anthropology venues, including American Anthropologist, Human Organization and Human Ecology. Her books include Grains from Grass: aging, gender and famine in rural Africa 2005, Cornell University Press; Economies and Cultures: foundations of Economic Anthropology (Co-authored with Richard Wilk) 2007, Westview Press; and Economies and the Transformation of Landscape (co-edited with Christopher Pool) 2008, Alta Mira Press.

E-mail: lisa.cliggett@uky.edu

Webpage: http://anthropology.as.uky.edu/users/cligget

 

Andy Cohen

Andy Cohen is a PhD student at the University of Sheffield working on a thesis entitled, ‘Settler Power, African Nationalism & British Interests in the Central African Federation, 1957-1963’.

E-Mail: andycohen100@hotmail.com

 

Andy DeRoche

Dr. Andy DeRoche –Lead History Instructor; Front Range Community College; Longmont, Colorado, USA – spent 2005 as a Senior Fulbright Scholar at UNZA. He is currently working on a book tentatively entitled ‘Kenneth Kaunda and the USA, 1960-1991’.

Email: ajdti89@hotmail.com

 

Lawrence Dristas

Dr. Lawrence Dritsas is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow and is attached to the Science Studies Unit at the University of Edinburgh. He is in the early stages of investigating the social position of scientific workers and their research in Northern Rhodesia during the Federal years. The status of the knowledge produced by scientists who worked for the colonial governments will be investigated and analysed in light of the competing interests structuring late-colonial scientific practice and from individual, institutional, territorial, and federal standpoints. Lawrence has an MSc in Science & Technology Studies from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and a PhD in African Studies from the University of Edinburgh. (Thesis title: ‘The Zambesi Expedition, 1858-64: African Nature in the British Scientific Metropolis’.) Dristas’ broad scholarly interests are in the history of scientific ideas and the changing societal role of such knowledge in Britain and its imperial spaces from the Enlightenment until today. His thesis research on the British scientific community and its engagement with Africa in the nineteenth century focused on the ideologies and modes of scientific practice and the social meanings and value of the knowledge produced by these activities. In his current project he has moved from the nineteenth century to the period of late colonialism.

E-mail: L.Dritsas@ed.ac.uk

 

John W. Donaldson

John W. Donaldson is Research Associate, International Boundaries Research Unit, Geography Department, Durham University, UK. His PhD research continues to focus on the physical demarcation of the DRC-Zambia boundary, although he has also examined the demarcation and physical maintenance of all other international boundaries of Zambia.

E-mail: j.w.donaldson@durham.ac.uk

 

Lawrence Flint

Lawrence Flint is working on Zambia’s Western Province for a PhD at the University of Birmingham. His main concern is the ‘historical construction of notions of citizenship and subjectivity amongst the Lozi people of western Zambia and north-eastern Namibia.’ He is also currently compiling a knowledge base of the history of the Upper Zambezi valley region from Zambian Independence to the present day and is very interested in talking to anyone who has information on events during this period. The objective is to produce academic papers and a book (in English and Silozi) to add to a future collection making up a full social history of the region. This collection will be housed in the main royal centres of the old Lozi kingdom for the use of those who cannot afford to buy books as well as being published for the wider public in Zambia and the wider world. Flint is also Executive Director of the Africa Information Centre (AIC) based in the UK, an organisation which mainstreams the provision of web-based information on Africa, the conducting of advocacy, development consultancy work […], academic services for the teaching of Africa and web services. The AIC has commenced a small heritage and IT project called Barotseland.com, part of whose mission is to build an archive of historical books and documents concerning the history of the Lozi peoples and install modern IT facilities at the Nayuma Museum and Heritage Centre in Limulunga, Western Province.

E-mail: flint@africainformation.net

Websites: http://www.africainformation.net, http://www.barotseland.com

 

Edwin Flynn

Fr. Flynn is a Franciscan missionary and a former lecturer at the University of Zambia. He summarises his current research on the Dimu cult as follows: ‘When did the mudimu (ancestor) cult of the Bantu come into existence? What was the original meaning of the term, mudimu? For this I will need to go to Tervuren and do a linguistics research into the term *-dim- to finalise the topic. At the same time I will do some work on the meaning of terms like *-ganga-and *-kumu because these terms together with *-dim- are like three major pillars holding the topic together.’

E-mail: edwinflynn2@yahoo.co.uk

 

Alastair Fraiser

Alastair Fraser is a DPhil candidate at the Department of International Relations, University of Oxford, and affiliated research student at UNZA. Alastair is researching the politics of aid and is particularly interested in the impact of participatory planning for the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) and Fifth National Development Plan (FNDP) processes on the politics of civil society organisations and the personal ideology of civil society activists. He has recently completed a research project with John Lungu of Cobberbelt University on the social impacts of copper mine privatisation, which will form the basis of a civil society campaign in Zambia in 2007. Prior to starting his PhD, Alatair worked on aid, trade, debt, and mining issues for Action for Southern Africa, the successor organisation to the British Anti-Apartheid Movement.

E-mail: af441@cam.ac.uk

 

Tomas Frederiksen

Tomas Frederiksen’s current research is still engaged with mining in Zambia. It follows up a question that emerged during my research on the Zambian Copperbelt – why do some mining companies spend large amounts of money on environmental protection measure when regulatory pressures are very weak in Zambia? When asked, most mining companies pointed to international standards, norms and pressures such as the Toronto Stock Exchange disclosure requirements or the IFC Performance Standards. He is currently in Toronto on a 1-year Government of Canada Post-doctoral Research Fellowship exploring these pressures and attempting to understand how these affect the behaviour of mining companies in Africa. If you wish to see the results of this research, let him know and he will share them as he moves towards publication. My intention is to follow some of these pressures back to Zambia with field research in Lusaka and on the Copperbelt next year.

Email: tomasf@fastmail.fm

 

Fay Gadsen

Dr. Fay Gadsden, former lecturer in History, UNZA, is co-owner and Managing Director of Bookworld Publishers Ltd. She has been instrumental in the publication of a series of recent historical works. Her most recent publication, with M. Milimo, is ‘ La place des femmes’, in J.P. Daloze and J. Chileshe (eds.), La Zambie Contemporaine (Paris & Nairobi: Karthala & Ilra, 1996).

E-mail: gadsden@zamnet.zm

 

Leigh Gardner

Leigh Gardner is a D.Phil Student at the University of Oxford. Leigh’s current research examines the history of fiscal policy in Zambia and Kenya from the beginning of the colonial period through decolonization. It uses the history of revenue creation and government expenditure to understand the priorities of colonial administrations, how these changed over time and why, and what effect colonial institutions had on post-Independence governments. She hopes later to extend this research into other parts of Africa and other regions of the former British empire.

E-mail: leigh.gardner@jesus.ox.ac.uk

 

Jan-Bart Gewald

Dr. Jan-Bart Gewald is Senior Researcher at the African Studies Centre, Leiden. Within the theme group ‘Agency in Africa’, he is working on a social history of the motor car in Zambia in the twentieth century. He was recently awarded funding by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) for a five year inter-institutional multi-disciplinary research programme within the social sciences and humanities entitled, ‘ICE in Africa: the relationship between people and the Internal Combustion Engine in Africa’. Having written extensively on Namibian history, he is currently setting up a research programme dealing with the social history of the Internal Combustion Engine in Africa. In Zambia, Gewald hopes to conduct research on the social history of the motor-vehicle.

E-mail: Gewald@ascleiden.nl

 

Jennifer Gold

Jennifer Gold is an ESRC-funded PHD student at Cambridge University. Her doctoral research concerns ‘the spatiality of science, focusing on the transformation in the scientific cultures of the British Colonial Forest Service in the late colonial and early post independence periods. Through oral historical testimony and archival research my thesis analyses the multifaceted webs of connections and changing scales of governance influencing colonial scientific personnel in the period leading up to decolonization. It then charts the post independence reconfiguration of colonial scientific networks as overseas officers obtained second careers.’

E-mail: jmg81@cam.ac.uk

 

David Gordon

David Gordon (Associate Professor, Bowdoin College, USA) received his B.A. from the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Princeton University. His scholarship focuses on southern and central African history, with a special emphasis on Zambia. His forthcoming book on the history of spiritual beliefs in Zambia, ‘Invisible Agents: Spirits in a Central African History’, will be published by Ohio University Press in 2012. He has also edited a collection with Shepard Krech entitled ‘Indigenous Knowledge and the Environment in Africa and North America’ (forthcoming with Ohio University Press in 2012). His first book, a social, environmental, and economic history of the Mweru-Luapula region of Zambia and the DRC, ‘Nachituti’s Gift: Economy, Society and Environment in Central Africa’, was published by the University of Wisconsin Press. He has published articles that deal with aspects of Zambian history in numerous scholarly journals, including the ‘Journal for African History’, ‘Journal of Southern African Studies’, ‘William and Mary Quarterly’, and ‘Comparative Studies in Society and History’.

E-mail: dgordon@bowdoin.edu

 

Jeremy Gould

Dr. Jeremy Gould is based at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Helsinki. His current research project, funded by the Academy of Finland, is entitled ‘Law and politics in Zambia’. Its broad aim ‘is to better understand the role of modern law in the constitution of the state in post-colonial Africa. Western analyses of African politics stress the importance of the ‘rule of law’ as a precondition for a wide variety of virtuous ends: democracy, development, justice, social order, and so on. As an anthropologist, I am interested in understanding how the rhetoric of legalism plays out in everyday life. This entails three lines of inquiry. One, I am trying to understand why legalism has become so central to political rhetoric and practice. Second, I am exploring the political consequences of legalism: Which actors and what agendas are empowered by the enhanced valuation of legal expertise? Third, I have been investigating how the legal profession has responded to the new (post-1991) pluralist political dispensation. To these ends I have employed a mix of methods. The main emphasis has been on ethnographic engagement with the legal profession – participatory observation and open-ended conversations have been complemented with structured questionnaires (among law students and bar examinees), and the extensive use of secondary materials (reports, correspondence, newspaper articles). A central subject for extended case analysis is a comprehensive study of the participation of the Law Association (LAZ) in the Oasis Forum. One of several planned outputs of this project is to be a book on the Oasis Forum based on my research in conjunction with post-graduate theses (on the political strategies of Zambian women’s movement and of the Catholic Church) written by two MA students at the University of Helsinki’.

E-mail: gould@valt.helsinki.fi

 

Godfrey Haantobolo

Godfrey Haantobolo, Deputy Chief Research Officer in the Research Department of the Zambian National Assembly, has recently been awarded a scholarship from the Southern African Defence and Security Management (SADSEM) Network for a PhD degree at Witwatersrand University. His thesis investigates the ‘nature, character and degree of civil control of the military and its impact on civil-military relations in Zambia’ between 1964 and 2000.

E-mail: ghnhaantobolo@yahoo.com

 

Joan Haig

Joan Haig is an ESRC-funded PhD student at the Centre of African Studies, University of Edinburgh and a Research Associate, Department of History, UNZA. Haig’s current research is on national identity and cultural boundaries among the Asians of present-day Zambia. She writes: ‘My undergraduate degree in International Relations was from St Andrews University (2001), where I later trained as a terrorism analyst in the Centre for Studies of Terrorism and Political Violence. Following my MSc in Nationalism at the University of Edinburgh, I went to Nigeria to work at the University of the Niger Delta, for which I designed a two-term course in African Nationalism.’ She adds that she was born in the Northern Province of Zambia and educated in the Copperbelt and is keen to support local publishing and dissemination of research within Africa, and to this end she is currently working with Zambian Indian writers and printing outlets.

E-mail: joan.haig@ed.ac.uk

 

Karen Hansen

Professor Karen Hansen teaches Anthropology at Northwestern University. A long-established scholar of urban life in Lusaka, her current research interests concern dress practices and urban youth. While her acclaimed Salaula: The Word of Secondhand Clothing in Zambia was published in 2000, she is presently involved in ‘Youth and the City: Skills, Knowledge and Social Reproduction’, a collaborative, multi-site (Lusaka, Recife, Hanoi), interdisciplinary research project funded by the Council for Development Research, a branch of DANIDA. Informality Reconsidered: Perspectives from Urban Africa, a book she co-edited with M. Vaa, is being published by the Nordic Africa Institute.

E-mail: kth462@northwestern.edu

 

Robert Heinze

Robert Heinze is a doctoral student at University of Konstanz in Germany and describes his research as follows: ‘The Ph.D. thesis I am currently writing on is a comparison of the developments of radio broadcasting in Namibia and Zambia pre- to post-Independence. By taking into account a number of sources, such as official reports, internal documents, newspaper articles, recorded programmes and interviews, I try to get a broad view of the broadcasting system in both countries, taking into account governmental policies, actual ongoings in the radio stations, programming output and listener’s reception. However, it will focus on the experiences of the broadcasters themselves. The thesis will analyse the development of the stations over the political, social and economic break of Independence, looking at the ambivalent development of public/state broadcasting stations that, while they were recognized by politicians as well as members of civil society as important tools of nation building, this same idea of nation building formed the legitimative basis for governments to controlling more and more programme output and hierarchies of the stations’.

E-mail: Robert.Heinze@uni-konstanz.de

 

Hugo Hinfelaar

Rev. Dr. Hugo Hinfelaar, who first came into Zambia in 1958 as a White Father missionary in the Northern Province, has recently co-ordinated ‘The History of the Catholic Church in Zambia, 1895-1995’ (see 2.2) and compiled a comprehensive history of the Roman Catholic Church in Zambia (3.2.25). He is presently writing both his own memoirs and a history of the White Fathers in Zambia after WWII. Fr. Hugo Hinfelaar has returned to the Netherlands after 48 years of service in Zambia and is currently working on a comprehensive history of the Missionaries of Africa, popularly known as the White Fathers.

E-mail: hhinfelaar@gmail.com

 

Marja Hinfelaar

Dr. Marja Hinfelaar’s PhD thesis was published as Respectable and Responsible Women: Methodist and Roman Catholic Women’s Organisations in Harare, Zimbabwe (1919-1985) (Zoetermeer: Boekencentrum, 2001). A resident of Zambia since 1998, she has co-ordinated ‘The History of the Catholic Church in Zambia, 1895-1995’ and has conducted research into the history of the Zambian sisters’ organisations. She is currently working with the National Archives of Zambia on ‘A Survey of Non-Governmental Archives in Zambia’, a project sponsored by the Local Cooperation Fund of the Finnish Embassy. Marja now works at the National Archives of Zambia and is currently researching a history of church-state relations in Zambia.

E-mail: Marja.hinfelaar@gmail.com

 

David Hughes

David Hughes is Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Ecology of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. He writes: ‘I am quite new to Zambia. In the past, I have written on political transformation among rural smallholders in Zimbabwe and Mozambique. My forthcoming book – Frontier Dynamics: from Enslavement to Environmentalism on an African Border (University of Washington Press) – explains the rise of territorial control and struggle over the past hundred or so years. That shift took place at different times along the Zimbabwe-Mozambique border, but the reasons were similar: the claims of white settlers, loggers, or tourists placed a premium on fences, maps, and measuring hectares. The book concludes by arguing against neo-liberalism and for the retention of communal lands as areas in which smallholders – and only smallholders – may produce. In 2003, I turned to examining Southern African white, elite notions of land. I would like to explain how such a tiny minority – proportionately far smaller than the settler populations of the Canada, the US, Australia, or New Zealand – has felt entitled to own and manage so much land. In Zimbabwe, I have conducted research among commercial farmers, tour operators, writers, and photographers. In the main, they say two things: “we should own the land because we improved it” and “we should own the land because we preserve it best”. The striking contradiction between these two statements indicates an ambivalence in the meaning of “nature” in Southern Africa. As a chapter on Lake Kariba argues, white writing frequently conflates wilderness, beauty, and recreation. Future chapters will bring me to Zambia to study adventure tourism at Victoria Falls and immigrant white Zimbabwean farmers. I would like to entitle the book Engineered Ecology: how Whites Made Nature in Southern Africa’.

E-mail: dhughes@aesop.rutgers.edu

 

Nick Jackson

Nick Jackson is in his first year of PhD study at the University of Cambridge. He sends the following profile: ‘I am researching the origins of the Central African Federation, with particular reference to sources outside the official British Government papers. I intend to use sources in South Africa and the three states that succeeded the Federation to question the widely held belief that fear of South African expansionism on the part of Britain was the driving force behind the Federation’s establishment, and instead to suggest that events among the Rhodesian settler communities were the principal engines of the federal project. I am also particularly interested in the circumstances surrounding Nyasaland’s inclusion in the Federation, and in the attitudes and actions vis-à-vis the Federation of the Copperbelt mining firms. I would be delighted to hear from any other researchers who are interested in these topics, and indeed from anyone who has any information or sources that they would be willing to share with me.’

E-mail: npj21@cam.ac.uk

 

Nancy Jacobs

Nancy Jacobs is Associate Professor of History at Brown University. She is the author of the acclaimed Environment, Power, and Injustice: A South African History (Cambridge: CUP, 2003). She is currently researching into human-avian interactions in Sub-Saharan Africa, in general, and Zambia, in particular. She writes: ‘We have only a nascent understanding of African participation in colonial science and we know little about the politics of less strategic or remunerative sciences such as ornithology. In addition, we commonly recognize the natural world as an object of knowledge, exploitation, or protection but less as a participant in historical dynamics. My proposed project supersedes these limits in a study of the quotidian and seemingly peripheral interactions of people and birds. Far from being politically neutral, the relations of people with and around birds are imbued with contests over culture, race, and wealth […]. A study of human-avian relations reveals a fraught interracial and interspecies collaboration, thus tempering current understandings of exploitation and opposition in scientific and environmental politics. Furthermore, it has a tangible real-world application because the historical politics around birds reverberate through environmental development and protection in contemporary Africa’.

E-mail: Nancy_Jacobs@Brown.edu

 

Webby Kalikiti

Dr. Webby Kalikiti is the current Head of the History Department, UNZA. Even though Kalikiti’s main area of interest is the social and economic history of Southeast Asia – his PhD thesis is entitled ‘Plantation Labour: Rubber Planters and the Colonial State in French Indochina, 1890-1939’, University of London, 2000 – he has also undertaken research on Africa and Zambia.‘Changing Perceptions, Political Rhetoric and the HIV/AIDS in Zambia, 1983-2003’ is his current research project.

E-mail: kwebby2000@yahoo.com

 

Walima T. Kalusa

Dr. Walima T. Kalusa is Lecturer in History, UNZA and a Research Fellow for the AHRC project: ‘Death in African History, c.1800 to Present Day.’. Since completing his PhD thesis – ‘A History of Disease, Missionary Medicine and African Medical Auxiliaries in North-Western Zambia: The Case of Mwinilunga District, 1893-1964’, Johns Hopkins University, 2003 – he has been working on a CODESRIA-funded research: ‘African Medical Auxiliaries as Interpreters of Missionary Medicine in Colonial Mwinilunga, 1922-1964’. In addition, he has written a paper entitled ‘“Thinking Black”: Disease and Reconfiguration of Missionary Medical Discourse in Colonial North-Eastern Zambia, 1890-1964’. In the last few years, Kalusa has carried out research on how medical missionaries in colonial Zambia reconfigured their medical discourse with its related praxis to make their medicine more comprehensible to Africans. ‘My research has further extended to what meanings Africans themselves read in missionary medicine. Currently, I interested in exploring how African miners coped with death on the Zambian Copperbelt during the colonial era’.

E-mail: chamakalusa@yahoo.co.uk

 

Rita Kesselring

Rita Kesselring receive her PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Basel, Switzerland. In her PhD, she focused on South Africa and apartheid-era victimhood today, tracing the formation of a victims’ subject position both in the working of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, in U.S. and South African Courts and beyond. Her focus of inquiry are victims themselves and their attempts to overcome embodied experiences of violence. She specialized in legal anthropology and the anthropology of the body. She intends to work in the Copperbelt area and at the intersection of environment, the body and agency. She is a senior lecturer at the Institute of Anthropology at the University of Basel.

Email: Rita.Kesselring@unibas.ch

 

Thomas Kirsch

Thomas Kirsch is university lecturer at the Department of Anthropology at Goldsmiths College (University of London). He has carried out ethnographic fieldwork in the Southern Province of Zambia. His PhD research has focused on the anthropology of religion, particularly prophet-healing churches and the intersection of the anthropology of Christianity and media anthropology. In recent years, he has also conducted fieldwork on violence and crime prevention in South Africa.

E-mail: t.kirsch@gold.ac.uk

 

Fiona Klein Kouwenberg

Fiona Klein Kouwenberg is completing her MA in African Studies at the University of Leiden. Her dissertation, based on a 3-month-long fieldwork in the Northern Province, examines the ‘socio-economic impact of Tazara on daily life in Kasama’.

E-mail: fionakk@zonnet.nl

 

Miles Larmer

Miles Larmer is Lecturer in post-1945 Global History at Sheffield Hallam University in the UK. He writes: ‘ I am currently completing a phase of research examining various manifestations of political opposition in post-colonial Zambia, including opposition political parties, rural rebellion and the 1980 coup attempt. This is expected to form a monograph on this subject, which will offer an alternative perspective to the dominant nationalist interpretation of politics in post-colonial Africa. Related to this, I am working on the private papers of Valentine Musakanya, an important figure in post-colonial Zambian political and diplomatic history: this should generate a biographical study to be published in Zambia. A second current strand of research focuses on globalisation and anti-globalisation discourses in southern Africa, and on the history and current practice of social movements in the region. This is expected to generate a monograph. I am embarking on a new area of research on the nature of geopolitical, national, social and ethnic conflict during Central-Southern Africa’s “thirty years war” (1961-91), with particular reference to the Democratic Republic of the Congo’.

E-mail: m.larmer@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Adrienne LeBas

Adrienne LeBas (Ph.D., Columbia University) is currently Assistant Professor of Government at American University in Washington, D.C. She was previously a Prize Research Fellow at Nuffield College, University of Oxford, and Assistant Professor of Political Science and African Studies at Michigan State University. Her main period of research in Zambia was 2002-2005, when she was doing doctoral fieldwork on labor politics and party development. Zambia is one of the main cases in her book, From Protest to Parties (OUP, 2011). Originally a Zimbabwe specialist, LeBas currently spends most of her research time in Kenya and Nigeria. Publications of interest to Zambia specialists include: From Protest to Parties: Party-Building and Democratization in Africa (OUP, 2011); and “The Politics of Institutional Subversion: Organized Labour and Resistance in Zambia,” in John Chalcraft and Yassen Noorani, eds., Counterhegemony in the Colony and Postcolony (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007).

E-mail: adrienne.lebas@gmail.com

 

Christopher Lee

Christopher Lee is currently an assistant professor of African history at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His current research focuses on Coloured identities in British Central Africa (Malawi and Zimbabwe as well as Zambia).

E-mail: cjlee1@email.unc.edu

 

Melle Leenstra

Melle Leenstra holds a BSc in rural development and an MSc in development economics from Wageningen University. He is currently working on a PhD on the history of the Zambian health reforms from 1991 to 2006. He combines this research with a policy maker’s job as desk officer for Zambia at the Netherlands ministry of foreign affairs. This gives him a broad perspective on and interest for political developments in Zambia, social change and donor-government relations.

E-mail: Melle.leenstra@gmail.com

 

Luregn Lenggenhager

Luregn Lenggenhager, lic. phil., is an assistant and doctoral student at the History Department of the University of Zurich. In January 2011 he started his PhD on practices of claiming and ordering of spaces in the discourse of nature conservation, specifically in the Zambia-Namibia borderlands. With his project Lenggenhager intends to look at different practices used to ‘create’ nature conservation areas in the region of the planned Kavango- Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area. Although his main focus is on the Caprivi Region in Nambia, he does not like to stop his research at the national borders and aims at including parts of Zambia’s Western and Southern Provinces in his research.

Email: luregn.lenggenhager@uzh.ch

 

Hugh Macmillan

Dr. Hugh Macmillan, Senior Lecturer in History at UNZA between 1978 and 1995, is presently Senior Associate Member at St. Antony’s College, Oxford. For the past two years, he has been working ‘on a history of Susman Brothers & Wulfsohn, a Northern Rhodesian/Zambian trading business which dates back to 1901, when the Susman brothers crossed the Zambezi and began to trade cattle form Barotseland south to Bulawayo.’ Hugh is currently doing research for a book on the history of the ANC in exile in Zambia, 1964-94. He has a Leverhulme fellowship at the African Studies Centre, Oxford University, which will last until 2010. He has written a chapter in Robin Palmer (ed.) A House in Zambia: 250 Zambesi Road (approximate title) which is due to be published by Bookworld in Zambia. He also edited and published his mother’s memoir, Mona’s Story: an Admiral’s Daughter in England, Scotland and Africa, 1908-51 (Oxford: Oxford Publishing Services, 2008), which does contain some references to Northern Rhodesia in 1931.

E-mail: hughmacm@gmail.com

 

Giacomo Macola

After completing his PhD thesis – recently published as The Kingdom of Kazembe. History and Politics in North-Eastern Zambia and Katanga to 1950 – Dr. Giacomo Macola returned to Zambia, courtesy of the Leverhulme Trust (Study Abroad Studentship, 2001-2002), to conduct research into the ethno-historical literature of colonial Zambia and Malawi. This work, which has resulted in the compilation of a number of academic papers, led him to take a close look at the politics of history-writing, the impact of missionary activity, and the process of crystallization of ethnic identities in the twentieth century. Having completed his three-year-long Smuts Research Fellowship at Cambridge, Macola is now Lecturer in African History at the University of Kent at Canterbury. He is continuing to work on his biography of Harry Nkumbula and is laying the foundations for a future ‘Social History of Firearms in Central Africa to the Early Twentieth Century’.

E-mail: G.Macola@kent.ac.uk

 

Ian Manning

Ian Manning is Professional Member of the Southern African Institute of Ecologists and Environmental Scientists and is researching the history of the Bangweulu area. As he explains: ‘The main work is in progress, but bits and pieces are being produced on blogs and recently in the Natural Resources Consultative Forum newsletter’. Manning has had several past publications, and other are currently in the process of being published.

E-mail: ipamanning@gmail.com

 

Abigail Markoe

Abigail Markoe is a PhD student at John Hopkins University School of Medicine and is interested in the history of maternal and child health in Zambia, particularly infant health. ‘My dissertation will explore how Africans, European missionaries, and public health officials defined healthy childhood throughout the 20th century in Zambia. I spent 2 months conducting archival research across Zambia in 2007 as a Research Affiliate in the Department of History at the University of Zambia. In future research trips to Zambia, I want to explore transformations in childrearing and infant feeding practices that occurred as a result of the introduction of artificial infant formula, western public health campaigns, migration, and urbanization. I am also interested in African ideas about infant mortality— its causes and its prevention in a high mortality setting.’

E-mail: amarkoe1@jhmi.edu

 

Guni Mickles-Kokwe

Guni Mickels-Kokwe is a Research Fellow at the Roskilde University in Denmark. Guni is finalizing a PhD in international development studies during 2009. The dissertation investigates the interrelationship between natural resources and livelihood diversity in the miombo woodlands of Southern Africa, based on case studies from the wetter miombo of Zambia over the period 1950-2005. Guni’s other research interests include commercialization of non-wood forest products, community based natural resource management, and sustainable agricultural development. She combines research with development work, having worked in several forestry, fisheries and agriculture-related development projects in the region in the past. She is quite keen to explore how historical research may inform development interventions.

Email: guni@zamnet.zm

 

Lawrence Maumbi Michelo

Lawrence Maumbi Michelo is a PhD Student at the University of Cape Town in the Department of Political Studies. His thesis title reads: ‘Regionalism, human security and the challenges of development in Africa: A case study of the Southern African Development Community (SADC)’. The thesis research focuses on new regionalism, human security in the context of new global political economy in the post cold era. The case study is the transfrontier conservation (TFCAS) unit of SADC -The Kavango–Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) covering Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana and Namibia. In his own words: ‘I am an interested reader of African politics; international relations; international political economy; globalization, regional integration and new regionalisms African political economy and comparative politics. Further, I am also engrossed in development debate within good governance, social capital and neoliberal parlance. Making a bridge between the reigning theoretical debates to practical experience gained through active engagement in development interventions by with NGOs, government bodies and rural organizations.’

E-mail: lmichelo@gmail.com

 

Juliette Milner-Thornton

Juliette Milner-Thornton is a niece of the well-known UNIP politician, Aaron Milner, and an Adjunct Research Fellow at the School of Humanities, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Her PhD research investigated the origination, formation and endurance of a ‘Coloured’ identity in Zambia. She writes: ‘The mixed race experience in Zambia is distinctive: the majority of Zambian “Coloureds” are descendants of colonial British men and African women. Among the surnames of Zambian “Coloureds” can be found the surnames of early British pioneers and settlers in Northern Rhodesia. The primary objective of her PhD research was to show that although the memory of the absentee white colonial fathers in present-day Zambia may have faded within the historical narratives, the influences of their colonial actions can still be traced to social, cultural, racial and political experiences of the current generation of their “Coloured” descendants.’ The result of this research is to be released by Palgrave Macmillan as ‘The Long Shadow of the British Empire: the Ongoing Legacies of Race and Class in Zambia.

E-mail: thornton@star.brisnet.org.au

 

Jaime Monson

Jamie Monson is an Associate Professor of History, Department Chair, Carleton College. Monson is working on the history of the TAZARA railway. She has just completed a book manuscript on the history of TAZARA and its reception in the rural areas of southern Tanzania. For the second book project, she plans to write about the work experiences of the Tanzanian, Zambian and Chinese workers who labored side by side during construction. She hopes to frame this study in the context of transglobal labor history, and to base it primarily on oral interviews with former railway workers. In addition, Jamie would like to create archival quality videotaped interviews that could be stored in the three countries as a record of the memories of the railway workers.

E-mail: jamiemonson@yahoo.com

 

Friday E. Mulenga

Friday E. Mulenga is a Lecturer in History at the University of Zambia. He is writing a book on the history of labour and trade unionism in Zambia.

E-mail: fridayemulenga@yahoo.com

 

Mwelwa Musambachime

After teaching at the University of Namibia (1997-2000) and serving as the Zambian Ambassador and Permanent Representative at the United Nations (2000-2004), Professor Mwelwa Musambachime is back at the History Department of the University of Zambia. Not only is he revising his PhD dissertation (‘Development and Growth of the Fishing Industry in Mweru-Luapula, 1920-1964’, University of Wisconsin, 1981) for publication purposes, but he is also working on a number of manuscripts, the principal of which are: ‘The Oral History of Mansa’, ‘A History of Metallurgy in Zambia to 1920’, and ‘The Failed Diplomatic Negotiations on the Anglo-Belgian Boundary 1890 – 1964’.

E-mail: mwelwamusambachime@yahoo.com

 

Patience Mususa

Patience Mususa is a PhD candidate in Social Anthropology with the University of Cape Town. Her research looks at what happened to the texture of place and the experience of life on a Zambian Copperbelt town when the state owned mine the Zambia Consolidated Copper Mines (ZCCM) were privatized in the mid 1990′s following the implementation of structural adjustment policies that introduced free market policies and drastically reduced social welfare.

Email: pmususa@gmail.com

 

Garth A. Myers

Garth Myers is Associate Professor of African Studies and Geography at the University of Kansas and Associate Director of the Kansas African Studies Centre. Since 1989, his main research concern has been the ‘cultural-historical geography of African development and urban planning, largely in Tanzania and Zambia’. As shown by some of his most recent publications, his ‘ongoing Zambia research interests include the environmental dimensions of urban development and the historical geography of late colonial urban policies’.

E-mail: gmyers@ku.edu

 

Ruth Payne

Ruth Payne is a PhD student in the Geography Department, Royal Holloway, University of London. During 2008, Ruth has concentrated on writing up her doctoral thesis on Child Headed Households, which was submitted in October and was successfully defended. She returned to Zambia in March 2008 to conduct a series of workshops with research stakeholders in order to formulate plans for a comprehensive feedback programme which will commence in 2009. Visit http://www.streetchildafrica.org.uk/site//about-street-children/research.php to view research stakeholder information, research updates and newsletters.

E-mail: r.payne@rhul.ac.uk, ruthedp@yahoo.co.uk

 

Iva Pesa

Iva Pesa is a PhD candidate at the University of Leiden. Her research topic is ‘A Social History of Mwinilunga district. Patterns of livelihood procurement, consumption and daily life in Mwinilunga district, 1940s-1970s’.This research will examine the ways in which individuals from Mwinilunga district, in the Northwestern Province of present-day Zambia, made a living and to examine which motives underlay the choices of their specific livelihood paths. Attention will be paid to the interconnected nature of different strategies of livelihood procurement (agricultural production, trade, wage employment, labour migration, etc.) and to the ways in which these choices were based upon, but at the same time affected the various aspects of daily life (manifested, among other things, in changing patterns of consumption). Differential factors such as gender, age, class and educational level will be taken into account and their relative importance will be assessed. The main time focus will be on the period from the early 1940s until the late 1970s. Iva’s MA thesis is entitled ‘Cinderella’s Cassava: A Historical Study of Agricultural Adaptation in Mwinilunga District from Precolonial Times to Independence’ (University of Leiden, 2009).

Email: pesablast@hotmail.com

 

Ian Phimister

Ian Phimister is Professor of International History at The University of Sheffield and is currently working on the Origins and Development of the Copperbelt, 1895-1929 and The Breaking of Broken Hill.

E-mail: ian.phimister@btinternet.com

 

Bizeck Jube Phiri

Bizeck Jube Phiri is Professor of History at UNZA. Chief Editor of the UNZA’s Journal of Humanities, Professor Phiri has recently been appointed to the Advisory Board of the Journal of Southern African Studies. Prof. Phiri informs us that: ‘After six years as Dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, my second and final three-year terms ends on 31st December 2007. I have taken long leave from 2nd January 2008 to 30th June 2008. This is to allow me complete some publications that I could not complete while in the Dean’s Office. Being Dean was challenging and rewarding in may respects. I should mention that despite the busy schedule in the Dean’s Office I was promoted twice while in that office, first from the rank of Senior Lecturer to Associate Professor and, second from the rank of Associate Professor to Full Professor in January 2007. I am therefore going back to my department as a Full Professor. Colleague in the Network may also wish to know that I have been appointed Member of the National Constitutional Conference (NCC), representing the University of Zambia.’ His current projects include: i) The Southern African Defence Security Management (SADSEM) Network, of which I am the Project Manager in Zambia is still conduction the research on “Zambia and the Liberation of Southern Africa”
(ii) I am also a member of a collaborative research team on UK-Africa Academy Project on “Hegemony and Power: South Africa and the Southern African sub-continent, 1965-2005″ a British Academy-funded project at the University of Sheffield, in partnership with the Universities of Pretoria, Swaziland and Zambia. It will run from February 2007 until December 2009.

E-mail: bphiri@hss.unza.zm, jube56@yahoo.com

 

Felix J. Phiri

After working as a missionary in Tunisia in the late 1990s, Fr. Felix J. Phiri (White Fathers – Missionaries of Africa) is presently completing his PhD at the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London. His thesis focuses on Islam in Zambia and the development of local Muslim associations. ‘Given the fact that little is actually known about Islam in Zambia, the study also provides a lot of historical material about the origins and development of the Muslim community in the country’ .

E-mail: felixjphiri@yahoo.co.uk

 

Rob Power

This study will seek to investigate the changing relationship between African nationalism and the British Government in Zambia and Malawi during the years of the Central African Federation in an attempt to explain why, having placed so much faith in the Federal panacea in 1953, it was abandoned on the rocks of racial exclusivity only ten years later. Central to this study will be an examination of the factors that precipitated such a major reappraisal of Britain’s attitude to African nationalism. The study will explore the changing dynamics of African politics, seeking to identify the effect that the imposition of Federation on an unwilling African populace had upon the educated elite of Nyasaland and Northern Rhodesia and how the Congress Parties in both territories were able to mobilise such widespread support in a society which had relatively little political education. Fundamentally, this will involve an in-depth analysis of the very essence of ‘nationalism’ itself. Did Africans in Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland genuinely identify with a ‘national’ cause or was Congress simply able to capitalise on the anxiety precipitated by the potential spread of discriminatory Southern Rhodesian racial policy and string together local grievances to form part of a ‘national’ campaign? Whilst placing the growth of African political consciousness in the wider framework of British policy considerations, the study will examine the factors that informed Britain’s perceptions of African nationalism. With special reference to the role of anti-colonial pressure groups such as the Africa Bureau and the Movement for Colonial Freedom, the study will consider the effects of the reorientation in attitude towards Empire in Britain and the important ramifications that this exercised upon Africans in Central Africa.

E-mail: robpower25@hotmail.com

 

Thera Rasing

Dr. Thera Rasing is an anthropologist specializing in gender and religion, and she is the head of the Gender Department of the University of Zambia. She has just completed a study of attitudes towards HIV/AIDS among Pentecostal, Protestant and Catholic Churches in Lusaka, with a focus on Pentecostal Churches. Her current research is on gender and death, which ‘examines how gender differences are institutionalised in death and mourning rituals and how they are “performed” in these rituals. It explores how gender identities come to the fore in the performance of rituals surrounding death and how they construct the meanings of gender roles. The study focuses on the emotional involvement of men and women upon death, that is, their “gendered experiences”. The gender differences in rituals surrounding death can best be seen in rituals surrounding the loss of a spouse and still born children. Therefore, the focus of this research is on how women and men deal with the loss of a spouse and a still born child’.

E-mail: trasing@zamnet.zm

 

Jeff Schauer

Jeff Schauer is a PhD candidate at the University of California, Berkeley, where he is writing a dissertation on the politics of wildlife in eastern and central Africa between 1890 and 1980. His research explores how spheres of economic development, governance, conservation, nationalist politics, and the proliferation of international and global institutions have shaped or have themselves been informed by the presence of wildlife in the region. The project relies on archival research conducted in Britain, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, the United States, and Zambia. His teaching experience includes African, British, and environmental history fields.

Email: schauer@berkeley.edu

 

Lyn Schumaker

Dr. Lyn Schumaker is Wellcome Research Lecturer at the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine of the University of Manchester. Having published her innovative monograph on the Rhodes-Livingstone Institute, she is presently researching on the history of labour migrancy and medicine in the Lake Bangweulu area.

E-mail: Lyn.schumaker@man.ac.uk; lynschumaker@yahoo.co.uk

 

Bennett Siamwiza

After completing ‘A History of Famine in Zambia, c. 1825-1949’, PhD thesis, Cambridge University, 1998, Dr. Bennett Siamwiza has been lecturing in History at UNZA. Although the subject of his PhD remains his main area of interest, he is also researching on ‘Land Reform and Local Politics in Southern Zambia’ and ‘Chiefs, Commoners and Enclosure in the Gwembe Valley, Zambia’. In a forthcoming article, he examines the history of the nursing profession in colonial Zambia.

E-mail: bennettsiamwiza@yahoo.co.uk

 

Ruth Simbao

Ruth Simbao is an Associate Professor in Art History and Visual Culture at Rhodes University, South Africa. She received her PhD from Harvard University in 2008. Her dissertation was on performance and the ‘escorting of tradition’ in relation to cultural festivals in Zambia. Simbao was an American Council of Learned Societies postdoctoral fellow in 2010-2011, and is currently the leader of a Mellon-funded research group, Visual and Performing Arts of Africa (www.research-africa-arts.com), which founded the Arts Lounge at the National Arts Festival in South Africa. She writes on the creative arts of Africa and has published in journals such as African Arts, NKA, JACANA, Art South Africa, Parachute, Third Text and de Arte. Recent research interests include China-Africa relations and the arts, for which Simbao is the curator of the exhibition “Making Way: Contemporary Art from South Africa and China” (www.makingway.co.za).

E-mail: r.simbao@ru.ac.za

 

Anthony Simpson

Dr. Tony Simpson is a temporary lecturer in social anthropology at the University of Manchester. His PhD thesis, based on his personal involvement in the day-to-day life of the mission boarding school where he taught English between the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, was published as “Half-London” in Zambia: Contested Identities in a Catholic Mission School (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2003). Having held an ESRC research fellowship entitled ‘Men and Masculinities in the Fight Against HIV/AIDS in Zambia’, he is currently working on a book on Zambian masculinities.

E-mail: half_london@yahoo.co.uk

 

Thula Simpson

Thula Simpson is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Historical and Heritage Studies at the University of Pretoria. Thula describes his background and current research in the following terms: ‘I completed my DPhil at Birkbeck College, University of London in 2007 on the history of the armed struggle waged by the African National Congress of South Africa between 1961 and 1990. From 2007 to 2009 I undertook a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Pretoria where I furthered my research on the same subject. My area of interest is Southern African history in general, with a focus on the contemporary era and the so-called “Thirty Years’ War” for liberation from minority rule in the region. I have used my studies of the ANC’s relations with other organisations, movements and governments in the subcontinent as the basis for my studies on the subject. During my studies on my chosen topic, I have managed to conduct research in the archival repositories at the Universities of the Witwatersrand, Cape Town, the Western Cape, Fort Hare and London, as well as in the National Archives of South Africa, Swaziland and Zambia. My project will culminate with me integrating this research into a single volume history of the ANC’s armed struggle’.

Email: thula.simpson@up.ac.za

 

Erika Cornelius Smith

Erika Cornelius Smith is PhD Student in the Department of History at Purdue University. Her research focuses on the relationship among gender, nationalism, and food in Zambia. She attended the African Studies Association annual meeting in 2008 and presented a work-in-progress titled “Recipes for New Nations: Gendered Nationalism in Zambia.”

E-mail: ecorneli@purdue.edu

 

Ken Vickery

Ken Vickery is a Professor of History at North Carolina State University. Ken is interested in labor history in southern Africa and more particularly the history of labour on the Rhodesia Railways. He is preparing a biographical study of Roy Welensky in the context of regional labor history.

E-mail: Vickery@social.chass.ncsu.edu

 

Alan Whitworth

Alan Whitworth is an economist with the UK Government Department for International Development (DFID), London and a research associate of the Zambian Institute for Policy Analysis & Research (ZIPAR). He worked for DFID Zambia between 2007 and 2012 and was seconded part time to ZIPAR for 18 months until March 2012.

Alan is co-author and co-editor of ‘Uganda’s Economic Reforms’, OUP 2010. His papers on Zambian Roads; Railways; Fuel Prices; Fiscal Trends; and Appraisal of Capital Investment Projects are downloadable from the ZIPAR website. His chapters on Zambian Transport Policy and Energy Policy will be published in ‘Zambia: Building Prosperity from Resource Wealth’, edited by C. Adam, P. Collier and M. Gondwe, OUP 2013. Alan is currently editing a book (with Bob Liebenthal) for ZIPAR on the history of Zambian economic policy since Independence. Hopefully, it will be published in time for the 50th anniversary of Independence in 2014.

E-mail: a-whitworth@dfid.gov.uk; alan.whitworth52@gmail.com

 

Leslie Zubieta

Leslie Zubieta is a doctoral student attached to the Rock Art Research Institute, University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. Her doctoral research in Eastern Zambia, central Malawi and north-western Mozambique is on the links between the Chinamwali girls’ initiation ceremonies and the White Spread-eagled rock art tradition.

E-mail: leslazu@gmail.com